What to do if Your Sprinklers Won’t Turn Off

Share:
Share on facebook
Share on google
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Share on email

If you have a sprinkler system at your home, this has probably happened to you. If not, it will soon. Below is our advice of what you should do if Your Sprinklers Won’t Turn Off. You can also check the video in this post for a visual, video guide.

 

First of all, check your timer box. Despite your model, shutting it off should be obvious. However, we’re assuming that you’ve tried that already and it didn’t help.

 

If messing with the controller itself didn’t solve the problem, then you’re looking at a mechanical failure of one of the parts. More than likely, that part is a sprinkler valve. We’re going to show you a few ways to handle that specific part, and it may just stop the water.

  1. Make sure the top of the cylinder piece on the top is snug but not too tight. If it is loose at all, give it a partial turn and wait 30 seconds to see if the water turns off. However, if you turn it too tight it mail cause more problems.
  2. If it doesn’t, then on the very back of the top cylinder is a small screw with tabs on it. This is called the Air Purge Screw and you can probably guess what it does. Give it a half a turn and you should start to see some water come out of the valve. This is normal since what you’re doing is clearing the valve of water. This serves to eliminate partial jams from bits of sediment or PVC cement that may have been in the water line.
  3. If the previous two steps haven’t helped then you’re left with the Sure-Fire way to stop the water:  turn the Irrigation Shut Off Valve into it’s opposite position. This valve is normally located near the sprinkler valves we were just discussing. It is often a large plastic valve built onto the pipe, and has large tabs big enough to put your whole hand on. Giving it a quarter turn will shut off the water to all the outdoor water (possibly even your pool float, if you have one).

Replacing the faulty valve

This is most often a job for a professional, but despite that fact you’ll need to be sure that the right parts end up getting installed. What most often leads to the valve failure in the first placed is someone who isn’t familiar with irrigation installing sub-par parts. A good sprinkler valve should last 5-10 years, but there are many bad parts that will fail in 1-3 years. Your landscaper may not be an irrigation expert, and just because he works with your yard does not qualify them to deal with the outdoor extension of your plumbing. We recommend using the RainBird JTV/ASV 075 if it is available to you, though RainBird’s products in general tend to be the better quality demanded by most of our clients.